Share Good Wishes and more in everyone’s Native Language

For millions (billions?) of people around the globe, the last quarter of the year involves recognition, observance and celebration of major religious holidays.  A wonderful part of this time is the emphasis on positive and shared commonalities of mankind – regardless of nation, skin color or culture.

A given religion’s holiday observation provides a strong while invisible “common bond” between foreign people.  The bond born of a religion’s holiday observations is based on shared beliefs and doctrines of their faith.  Often the only material difference between people may be their respective  spoken language.  This can create a barrier to sharing personal feelings and thoughts that come about during the holiday celebration.  That language translation barrier is being reduced (eventually eliminated?) through the power of the Internet.

In the way VoIP (Voice over Internet Protocol) in only 10 years reshaped telecommunications via “no cost” voice calls between any two computers regardless of distance and email made worldwide same-minute data exchange available to anyone – “Google Translate” is now simplifying Global communication ability just a bit more.

Christmas Tree of Many LanguagesCLICK HERE to immediately translate a word, phrase, paragraph or more into over 40 languages. Extend greetings and give the GIFT of native language exchange to  your foreign friend.

Allow me to extend my wish for a joyful and prosperous holiday season. For those celebrating the Christmas Holiday as I do, the image to right extends a “Merry Christmas” in at least 20 different languages.

UPDATE!  Visit the new Do more with Google Translate page to learn how to translate incoming email in Gmail or take Google Translate with you on your phone.  Also as of December 2,Google Translator Toolkit” is available to all www.GAYFD.net (Google Apps For Your Domain) accounts at no additional charge

This entry was posted in Android, Anytime Access, Blackberry, cloud computing, Uncategorized, Web 2.0. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Share Good Wishes and more in everyone’s Native Language

  1. While I agree with the premise of your contribution, as a regular user of Google I would also suggest caution be used. I use Google Translate for languages I speak, when I am not sure of an exact, or alternative translation – my experience is that one has to take care in choice of translation, for as we all know from our own languages, some words carry different meanings, and herein lies a risk. Yes, use it – double check though if you do not speak the language with a native speaker, for the nuance and underlying meaning. And, yes, may I take this opportunity to wish all celebrating in this season, a festive and safe holiday.

  2. Pete Foster says:

    I am the Marketing Director for an American Entertainment Company, and we have recently expanded to include international concerts.

    Google Translate has been very helpful in communicating fairly complex business ideas between myself in English, and business associates who speak Spanish, Portuguese, Dutch, German, Belarusian, and several other languages.

    I would be unable to affordably work with these people without a service like Google Translate.

    There have been some humorous moments reading what would otherwise be very strange comments and requests translated from different languages, and I’m sure some of my words have been translated into amusing sentences. However, we are sincerely attempting to bridge a gap that has kept us apart for all of humanity.

    While I will always pay a professional interpreter to write and advise regarding contracts or legal documents, I have found that most people are willing to make the effort to read beyond the relatively minor differences of syntax.

    I simply have to remember that colloquialisms do not usually translate well. Hitting the nail on the head, doesn’t always hit a home run!

    Feliz Navidad y Prospero Año Nuevo!

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